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1- REGULATION

2- SITTING   
3- EXCEPTIONS 
4- SETTING UP 
5-  SETTING UP AND REGULATING PENDULUM CLOCKS
6-  FLOATING BALANCE REGULATION
7-  MOVING YOUR TALL CASE OR FLOOR CLOCK
8- 400 DAY CLOCK INSTRUCTIONS
9- CUCKOO CLOCK HELP
SETTING UP:
      A Clock Is ' In Beat' when The Intervals between Ticks Are Exactly Equal. An Out 'Out Of Beat' Clock Can Be Heard Ticking Unevenly, With Alternately Long And Short Intervals Between The Ticks.
     Carefully fit the pendulum, wind up and gently set the clock going. After a few moments check the sound of the ticking. If it is not even, proceed as follows:
     Stop the clock by holding the pendulum in the central position. Carefully move the pendulum from side to side just enough to allow the ticks to be heard, and check which direction requires the least movement from the vertical position. It is in this direction that the crutch (the part that delivers the power to maintain the swing of the pendulum) needs to be moved or bent.
   The aim is to alter the position of the crutch in relation to the escapement and it is important to establish what provisions the manufacturer has made to enable this to be done.

      Many movements have friction joints which allow the crutch to be adjusted without bending. To adjust these, move the crutch in the desired direction to the limit of its free travel and then apply slight pressure. If the movement is fitted with a friction point, the crutch will move further with an even resistance. If the crutch starts to flex let go at once. If the movement of the crutch is restricted by, for instance, pins protruding from the back plate, the escapement will have to be held with one hand while the crutch is moved.

    Where no friction joint is fitted. The crutch needs to be bent. Never put any firm pressure on a crutch against the escapement as this may do serious damage. Always bend the crutch against the resistance of the other hand or between the fingers of the same hand.

     Whichever method is used, several attempts may be necessary as there is no method of measuring the alterations that you are making. Only make very small adjustments each time.

CUCKOO CLOCK HELP:
     Once you have removed the clock from the packaging, you will need to release the chains, (they are tied together to prevent from jumping off the chain wheel. Just remove the wire). Open the back cover of the case, you will see two bellows. Remove the two clamp-like wires from the top of the bellows. Close the back of the clock. Release the door lock of the bird door. Hang the clock on a very secure nail or screw. Hang the weights, hang the pendulum, and give the pendulum a swing. Make sure the tic-tic is even, if not, move the case a bit to the right or left while it is running, that will let you hear if the beat is right. Remember it should be even. You may use the minute hand to adjust the time, never move the hour hand. Most of the new cuckoo clocks are made to move the minute hand backward, however the same is not for the older models. You may adjust the time keeping by the leaf, which is on the pendulum. Moving it upward on the stick it will make the clock go faster, and vise versa. Avoid hanging your clock where there is air current, or excessive direct heat. Please consider the children in the house. Out of curiosity, children like to play with cuckoo clocks. Make sure that they don't pull on the chains. If you need further assistance with your cuckoo clock, call us or e-mail , we will be glad to help. 
EXCEPTIONS:
     French clocks have particularly fine and delicate escapements. Final adjustment is sometimes made by slackening the two screws on the back straps and rotating the whole movement imperceptibly. Re-tighten the screws to prevent the clock from rotating when being wound.

     Wall clocks may be given their final adjustments by moving the bottom of the case very slightly to one side or the other.

     Regulator movements often have screw-threaded beat adjusters, allowing very precise adjustment.

SETTING UP AND REGULATING PENDULUM CLOCKS:
     It is essential that a clock is 'set up' when put into operation after a move to a new position. No matter how thoroughly a pendulum clock is overhauled, if it does not receive this final attention, it may suffer from loss of power and subsequently stop. All clocks leaving workshops will have been set 'in beat' on a level surface. Provided that a clock is transported carefully with the pendulum removed and subsequently placed on a firm level surface, no adjustments may be necessary.    
SITTING:
     A mantel clock must be placed on a firm even surface. Long case or grandfather clocks should be screwed to the wall where there is any possibility of movement. Wall clocks should be hung on secure fixings (not nails) and uneven and unsound walls should be avoided.
REGULATION:
     A number of factors can affect the time keeping of a clock (temperature, balance, etc.). No matter how accurately a movement may keep time under workshop conditions, final adjustments are almost always necessary. 

     The longer the pendulum, the slower the clock will run. Most pendulums have a rating nut under the bob, and small adjustments should be made as necessary. Never alter the pendulum more than once in 24 hours and remember that some spring driven movements may run slower as the spring unwinds. Keep a note of the amount of adjustment made and the resulting effect.

     Some clocks have pendulum suspension systems that allow regulation without moving the case. A watch or double-ended key will fit the arbor protruding through the dial near the numeral 12. Generally, rotation of the arbor in a clockwise direction shortens the effective length of the pendulum, thus making the clock run faster.

     Never move a clock with the pendulum attached, as this will put it out of beat, damage the delicate spring on which the pendulum is suspended and may cause extensive damage to the escapement.

FLOATING BALANCE REGULATION
    If the clock is running fast move lever towards minus sign (-). If the clock is running slow move towards plus sign (+). Move lever only slightly and check after 24 hours, then repeat if necessary. Be careful not to damage the balance, since it is hanging on a coil centered by a thin steel wire. It is recommended to use tweezers for adjustments in this particular model.

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MOVING YOUR TALL CASE OR FLOOR CLOCK
      Care should be taken whenever you move your clock to insure that all accessory parts such as the pendulum and weights are removed and packed properly to prevent damage. Never wind a cable or chains drive movement without weights installed. Use gloves when handling the weights and the pendulum, wrap them in soft clothes or towels for moving purposes. Chime rods must be secured to prevent them from breakage. And remember to mark the weights-center- left- right, most of the time the heavy weight goes to your right when facing the clock. Never raise the weight with one hand while winding the clock with the other, those cables and chains are made to pull the weights up without lifting -or helping- up the weights by hand. Be gentle while handling the clock. Do not rush, write what you do.
400 DAY CLOCK INSTRUCTIONS
     The clock should be placed in a place free from vibrations, sunlight, heat or draft. The clock must be absolutely leveled. The clock will be leveled when the tip of the pendulum is directly over and in the middle of the guide cup. Make use of the leveling screws at the bottom of the clock to allow the pendulum tip to position itself directly over the guide cup. Start the clock by rotating the pendulum 360 degrees. Do not turn the pendulum more than 360 degrees, which will cause the suspension spring to fail. Set the time by the minute hand, the hour hand will follow. Do not touch or move the hour hand. To regulate the clock, on the top of three or four ball pendulum you will see a knurled regulating disc. On that disc you will see two arrows pointing to opposite directions and each arrow will have a letter f or s, f-for fast and s-for slow. 20 minutes after starting the clock remove the dome and set it to the right time. Check the time after 24 hours and see if adjustments are needed. Write down how much time is needed to adjust, and how much adjustment was made on the pendulum. Repeat the same until you have a fairly well timekeeping clock. 400-day clocks will run for 400 days, however better time is kept if the clocks are wound every 2 months.

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